Understanding: Landscape Hydrology

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Shirley Henderson
Posts: 356
Joined: Sun May 06, 2007 4:03 pm
Location: Thirlmere

Re: Understanding: Landscape Hydrology

Postby Shirley Henderson » Sat Jul 21, 2012 11:15 am

That is fantasic! Its been a along time since I have visited the NSF site but I am also working with communities and projects now (with funding) and this is a real inspiration. Who is Ian Sutton? Sorry if I have missed info about him.
What do you think of the weir Duane? Its working well but the water is going around the outsides. Do you think a V weir would have worked better? Just curious and not meaning to be critical as it looks like it is functioning very well. Jus always curious.
Shirley

duane
Posts: 1154
Joined: Fri Apr 20, 2007 1:44 pm
Location: Central Coast, NSW
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Re: Understanding: Landscape Hydrology

Postby duane » Sat Jul 21, 2012 8:53 pm

I first meet Ian 8 years ago thru Peter Andrews.

He is running for Local Government in the next election and will be a great person to have on Council.

Put Ian Sutton into the the Search box above to see other articles he has written that have been placed on this Forum.

The stormwater project was a joint collaboration with Peter Andrews and the outcome as you can see has turned a DRAIN into a functioning wetland system replicating a chain of ponds. It's rehydrating the landscape, capturing fertility and building biodiversity and building a new natural functioning ecosystem.

Before Ian's and Peter's interventions it was a desert where water, sediment and fertility rushed down the drain and out to sea. Now that's being captured and slowed down so Nature can rebuild a sutured wound in the landscape (ably assisted by people who can aid the land by their knowledge and understanding.)

Shirley Henderson
Posts: 356
Joined: Sun May 06, 2007 4:03 pm
Location: Thirlmere

Re: Understanding: Landscape Hydrology

Postby Shirley Henderson » Mon Jul 23, 2012 9:29 am

HI Duane, I will be passing this info around. More and more people that I speak with have heard of Peter and are very interested in his work. Where I work in Campbelltown NSW they have started using rocks and plants in waterways and drains to attempt to restore natural functioning systems. I am very pleased to see that happening here. Whether or not they are doing it right, I dont know but it sure looks better than before.
In regards to question abouth the weir?? I know there is a number of different ways to create weirs and the reasons I am sure they know. Can you let us in on why a weir staight accoss instead of a slope, slant or V.
Regards
Shirl :?:
Always eager to learn, I have printed Ians papers to read and share. :)

duane
Posts: 1154
Joined: Fri Apr 20, 2007 1:44 pm
Location: Central Coast, NSW
Contact:

Re: Understanding: Landscape Hydrology

Postby duane » Mon Jul 23, 2012 2:58 pm

Hi Shirley

The education and training course that is NOW running at Tarwyn Park teaches all this practical information.

There are 10 days all up in the course.

It is a wonderful opportunity to 'learn by doing'....evrything that you ever wanted to know about how to implement NSF in practical ways. I believe, it will be a chance that will NEVER come again....for those people lucky enough to attend as Peter is not getting any younger.

Anyway, in answer to your query re the rocks.

The best barrier to have in a drain, creek or gully is a biological, living barrier such as reeds or other plant material. Rocks are used only where the incision is so deep and great that plants would not get a toehold against heavy flows...they would in all likelyhood be washed away.

THE MAIN THING TO REMEMBER IS TO GET WATER DE-ENERGISED BY PUSHING WATER AGAINST WEATER. Any barrier PLACED in a flow line needs to achieve this first and foremost.

So, a barrier of rocks straight across is nothing more than a dam. Sure, it holds the water back and as it backs up it will flow fairly evenly over the dam spillway. By having a V shape i.e., low in the middle and building up the height of the rocks progressively higher towards the bank you create a flow that puts water against water which causes the moving water to de-energise below the structure by forming a pond. Then as the water starts to move out and down from the pond it creates a riffle until it meets the next interuption forming the so called 'pool and riffle effect'.

There are dozens of different ways that these strucrures can be achieved. Using rocks is but ONE [and using willows is another (but may be against the law) Check with your local CMA.]


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