Growing Reeds

Any questions or comments you have about Natural Sequence Farming processes. These could include general questions or ones about your personal problems.

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greg
Posts: 36
Joined: Wed Jan 02, 2008 6:43 pm
Location: Cooks Gap (Gulgong)(Mudgee)

Growing Reeds

Post by greg » Thu Jan 03, 2008 5:45 pm

Gidday All
This is my first attempt to use this website so bear with me.
I have been attempting to grow some reeds in my dam on and off for the last 3 years, but each time I plant them, they die.
I am told by most people who have them that they are easy to grow. I was wondering if I was holding my tongue the wrong way.
Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
Ta

Greg

duane
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Location: Central Coast, NSW
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Post by duane » Tue Jan 08, 2008 8:43 pm

Hi Greg

I will post something for you soon...which reeds are we talking???Phragmites spp or ??

greg
Posts: 36
Joined: Wed Jan 02, 2008 6:43 pm
Location: Cooks Gap (Gulgong)(Mudgee)

reeds

Post by greg » Fri Jan 11, 2008 7:36 pm

Gidday
I am not sure, I dug them out of a creek bed, the ones about 10' tall with brown heads on them??

Thanks
Greg

Shirley Henderson
Posts: 356
Joined: Sun May 06, 2007 4:03 pm
Location: Thirlmere

Post by Shirley Henderson » Mon Jan 14, 2008 8:43 am

HI Greg, this could be Typha Cumbungi. commonly known as bull-rushes. If it is this plant they are very vigorous growers and will spread quickly. It is often grown by seed sown on waterlogged soil. If its the same as most plants try germinating from Autumn onwards at least have the seed spread by spring. If you are unable to start from seed the plants have a rhizome (a root-like underground stem.) You can usually dig these out before spring, chop of the top of plant and plant these in the new spot. Do not reduce the foliage to below water level or else the hollow stems will fill with water and the plants will rot.
They will reshoot when the time is right. First confirm if this is the correct plant by looking at your local library or on the internet for images. They are fairly easy to recognise.
Hope this helps a little. I am sure Duane will have some good advice.
Shirley

greg
Posts: 36
Joined: Wed Jan 02, 2008 6:43 pm
Location: Cooks Gap (Gulgong)(Mudgee)

reeds

Post by greg » Mon Jan 14, 2008 4:59 pm

Thanks Shirley
That sounds like them and the internet pictures look about right.
I will give it another go with the seeds and dig a bit deeper for the roots and try again in Autumn.
Do they need to be under constant running water to kick them off. I have seen them in dry creek beds so thought it would work best on my block as my dam goes up and down a bit with the rain and sun.
Thanks again

Greg

Shirley Henderson
Posts: 356
Joined: Sun May 06, 2007 4:03 pm
Location: Thirlmere

Post by Shirley Henderson » Tue Jan 15, 2008 5:10 pm

Hello Greg, I would suggest planting them marginally or on the edges of your dam where they can be kept wet or at least moist until their roots establish. Is it a huge dam or small dam? This is important to consider as if you do get them growing they can take over whole areas extremely fast. You need to be sure this is what you want and it is the right place for them. I would definitely want some advice from Duane. In the mean time you could try starting them in pots and sit them on the edge of the water until you are certain where they should go. I dont believe they need constant running water. Some areas where I have seen them establish by themselves they seem to start growing on the side water flows out of the dam or waterway. I believe the flower spikes that breaks up and blows away is the the viable seed and holds up to 200,000 seeds, so be careful. Seed should be ready end of summer or could be ready now. Division of plants would be best between autumn and spring. Hope this helps.
Shirley

duane
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Joined: Fri Apr 20, 2007 1:44 pm
Location: Central Coast, NSW
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Post by duane » Sat Jan 19, 2008 7:58 pm

Greg

Been a little slow getting back to you on this but Shirley's got it pretty well covered...it is cumbungi and it does like gowing on the margins. As Shirley suggested a good place to grow it "Some areas where I have seen them establish by themselves they seem to start growing on the side water flows out of the dam or waterway". If you make this overflow area more of a contour instead of a drain it makes a good nursey for them.

Shirleys advice is spot on.

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